On March 5th 2012, Neil Holmes, one of our British viewers and author of "Liverpool Blitzed", wrote us that there is "[...]a war memorial with Private Hopwood's name on it in the small village of Shotwick on the Wirral. Although he lived a few miles away in Mollington, his family had lived in Shotwick since the 1870s and worshipped at the village church.

Shotwick is a tiny village, with no more than 15 houses, some outlying farms, a 17th century manor house and a medieval church that dates in part back to Norman times. The memorial is unusual since it cites the date he was killed, along with the fact he was fell at Arnhem. There is also a memorial pot dedicated to him within the family's plot in the graveyard.

The memorial is a sad reminder that even such a tiny village experienced loss during that terrible conflict. Frederick is also remembered with pride by the family and wider community, as the photograph of his field burial appears in several history books
"

Neil also sent us two photographs of the memorial; a general overall shot and a closer shot of the part that mentions Private Hopwood.
 

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It is good to know that this liberator, who's life was taken within the first days of the Battle of Arnhem, is remembered in his hometown, as well as on the battlefield where he fell and, later, in the Oosterbeek British Cemetery.

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From left to right:
Frederick Hopwood's Field Burial, the location today
and his grave at Oosterbeek Airborne Cemetery

 Neil Holmes contacted Frederick Hopwoods's family and from them he received the following three photographs of him in British Army Uniform. The first photo shows him with his original unit which appears to have been the Royal Artillery. The other two show Frederick in desert attire with jump wings on his shoulder in the Parachute Regiment.

(click for larger images)

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