Historical images compared with the current situations in the exact locations.

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Holland(1)  Holland(2)  Ardennes  Worldwide  Miscellaneous

Colleville-sur-Mer, June 6th 1944
Photo by Robert Capa showing a group of infantry men wading ashore, soldiers taking cover behind waterproofed M4 Sherman tanks and the smoke in the dunes further inland. Today the American Cemetery is located on top of the bluff on the right of the  photo.

Marcouf,
June 6th 1944

Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division advancing forward cautiously, next to the town church. Note the modified stairwell leading to the cemetery with a brick wall blocking pedestrians from any traffic.
 

Marcouf, June 6th 1944

Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division advancing cautiously next to the town church.

Turqueville, June 6th 1944
Private First Class Wilbur W. Shanklin of Regimental Headquarters Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment poses for the camera, guarding a soldier from the 795th Battalion (Georgian), 739 Grenadier Regt., 709th Infantry Division.

Turqueville, June 6th 1944
The first two photos are well known but the uncropped version and the ones with the Signal Corps cameramen and unlooking soldiers of the 4th Infantry Division show that it is a situation staged for the cameras.
Turqueville, June 6th 1944
The same scene but seen from just a different angle.
Turqueville, June 6th 1944
The making of the epic D-Day paratrooper photo. Signal Corps cameramen are being watched by infantrymen of the 4th Division.
Cherbourg, June 1944
On June 22nd a large assault on the port town of Cherbourg was launched. Here, American infantry crosses the intersection of Avenue Etienne LeCarpentier and the street which today is named Voie de la Liberté.
Cherbourg, June 1944
A gruesome photo showing the fierce fighting for the city. An American soldiers looks at a dead German soldier in a stairway on Rue Arman Levéel. Judging from his wounds, the German most likely died from the blast of an explosion; not by gunfire.
Cherbourg, June 1944
German Prisoners of War are escorted out of town by armed American soldiers. They are seen here walking past the large CHERBOURG sign on Rue Lucet. On 29JUN1944 the German command in the harbor and the arsenal finally surrendered to the Allies.
Coutances June 28th 1944

American soldiers in the Place du Parvis Notre Dame in front of the Cathedral.
On 24JUL1944, the Americans launched Operation "Cobra" and 4 days later, the 4th Armored Division moved from Périer to Coutances using the D971 highway.
The Germans defending this sector, retreated and left the city to the Americans who at the day seize the ruins of Coutances.
 

La Haye-du-Puits, July 1944
An older citizen of La Haye looks at the damage caused by Allied bombardments.
He is standing next to the town's public urinal opposite the church and looks in the direction of the market square; named Place du General DeGaulle today.
La Haye-du-Puits, July 1944
Photo taken in front of the church in the center of town in early July 1944. American Military Policemen search the personal belongings of a very young German Prisoner of War (POW) who is also ordered to take his shoes off. Two other German POW's stand against the church wall with their hands up.
La Haye-du-Puits, July 1944
The young POW is then told to join his comrades who are now standing left of the church entrance.
After the war, the pavement in front of the church has been raised and some of the steps have been removed.
La Haye-du-Puits, July 1944
American infantry moves toward the center of town past the Postoffice building in a street which is today named Rue du General LeClerc in July 1944.
Not the ammunition bearers with their pack trays on their backs followed by and infantryman with a fixed bayonet.
La Haye-du-Puits, July 1944
U.S. Navy officer Francis Leu and British correspondents interview an Asian soldier in a Wehrmacht uniform; presumably from a so-called "Ost-Battalion" made up of volunteers from Eastern European countries.
Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte, July 1944
The US Army has established Traffic Summary Court No. 4 in a building on the town square; today named Place Ernest LeGrand.
The sign advises truck drivers in the Red Ball Express not to "Keep 'em Rolling", but to "Stay on the ball and away from court".
When cited by Military Police, truckers had to appear in court to stand trial for traffic violations.
 
Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte, July 1944
A heavy weapons platoon of the 315th Infantry Regiment, a unit of the American 79th Infantry Division, moves in the direction of the west coast of Normandy after liberating La-Haye-du-Puits on July 9th 1944.
Cinthaux, August 8th 1944
Tiger "007" of German SS Panzer ace Michael Wittmann is seen here after it had been knocked-out by Allied tanks. More on this historic battle in Battle Study 31.

Sainte Marie du Mont, June 6th 1944

Soldiers of the 101st meet local civilians at the town pump. In front of the pump in the "Now-"photo, is Battle-detective Tom. His friend Antoine is trying to sneak out of the picture.

Carentan, June 20th 1944

Carentan was libererated by elements of the 101st on the 12th of June. On the 20th an award ceremony was held in the Place de La République. On June 4th 2006 this ceremony was reenacted, organized by the Carentan Historical Center. Battledetective.com was there.

Carentan, June 20th 1944

This is a comparison of the Place de la République as in the previous comparison, but at an average day.

Carentan, June 20th 1944

The same square from a different angle. Note the characteristic arcades on the right.

Carentan, June 1944

Again, the Place de la République and the monument to the fallen sons of Carentan in World War I. Here, an army priest leads an open air church service. Note parachute canopies on monument base.

Ravenoville, June 6th 1944

Paratroopers of various sub-units of the 101st gather at the Marmion Farm to regroup and engage the enemy. Note the French Renault tracked weapons carrier in the front of the Then-picture.

St. Côme-du-Mont, June 1944

This junction of the road from St Côme du Mont to Carentan and the road to St Marie-du-Mont was named "Dead Man's Corner" by American soldiers because of the dead tank commander still visible in the turret of this Stewart tank. Here we look up the road to St. Marie-du-Mont. Note the same type Renault weapons carries as in the previous Then-picture.

St. Côme-du-Mont, June 1944

The same road junction and the same knocked out light tank of "D" squadron/70th Tank Bn photographed from a different position. In the left corner of the picture is the road to St. Côme-du-Mont.

St. Côme-du-Mont, June 1944

The same location as in the previous comparison. The Carentan Historical Center opened an excellent museum in the house on Dead Man's Corner in 2006. This is our battledetective car in the position of the Stewart tank in our 2007 comparison.

St. Côme-du-Mont, June 1944

These aerial photographs from 2007 and 1944 show that the road junction is a bit different today. The angle of the road from St. Marie-du-Mont is not as sharp as it was in 1944 making it safer for traffic.

St. Côme-du-Mont, June 1944

View from the upstairs window in the Dead Man's Corner House looking South towards Carentan. Note that the paths of the roads have changed a little bit since 1944.

Ste-Mère-Eglise, June 1944

An American soldier takes a shot at the church tower of St. Mère-Eglise, probably at a German sniper, hiding in the bell fry. Note the posters with proclamations from the German occupiers on the wall. Posters for the 2007 French elections can be seen in almost the same spot in our comparison. A striking symbol for the freedom the invasion brought in 1944.

Ste-Mère-Eglise, June 1944

Almost the same spot, but now the GI in the previous picture is joined by his buddy.

 
 
 
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