Historical images compared with the current situations in the exact locations.

Click on the pictures to enlarge.

Normandy  Holland(2)  Ardennes  Wordwide

Arnhem May 1940
During the military mobilization in the months before the German invasion, Dutch conscripts take black-out precautions on Jansbuitensingel painting white stripes on the pavement in front of mail boxes and stamp vending machines.
Arnhem May 1940
The road bridge across the river Rhine in Arnhem has been demolished by the Dutch military authorities when Germany invaded the Netherlands on May 10th, 1940.Note shelters on the stairwell towers, originally designed as toll boots but toll was never charged on this bridge.
Tilburg, May 10th 1940
German motorized troops invading the Netherlands. Right behind the photographer is the bridge across Wilhelmina canal which has been blown up by the Dutch. The column has to wait until pioneers have built a new crossing.
Eindhoven, early 1940's
During the occupation of the Netherlands by Nazi Germany a unit of German soldiers marches through Willemstraat.
Eindhoven, early 1940's
German soldiers stand at attention during a military ceremony held on Markt. "Now-"photo taken during the 2020 COVID-19 crisis hence the lack of bystanders in the center square of the city.
Eindhoven, early 1940's
On a winter day we see a van parked on Vestdijk in the center of the city looking south. The sign in front of the vehicle says: “Wehrmachtstankstelle” (German armed forces fuel station) and “H.K.P.” for Heeres-Kraftfahrpark (Army motor pool).
Eindhoven, December 6th 1942
The aftermath of the RAF Operation "Oyster" or what is known in Eindhoven as the Saint Nicolas bombing raid on December 6th 1942. The targets of the operation where the Philips Works.
Eindhoven, December 6th 1942

This is the damage done on the factory buildings on Mathildelaan. The postwar construction of a parking garage across the street makes an exact comparison challenging.

Valkenburg, September 17th 1944
An M4 Sherman tank of the American 2nd Armored Division (nicknamed "Hell on Wheels") drives through the Grendelpoort Gate entering the medieval downtown area of Valkenburg in the Dutch province of Limburg.

Valkenswaard, September 17th 1944
On the first day of Operation"Market Garden" the spearhead of the British 30th Corps, the Guards Armored Division, stopped on Market square in Valkenswaard to camp for the night. The British started their attack in the afternoon and encountered more German resistance along "Club Route", the route of advance, than expected.
Valkenswaard, September 21st 1944
British trucks and other vehicles of the 4th Wiltshire Regiment on Markt square later into Operation "Market Garden".
"Now'- photo, and the previous one, were taken on 16SEP2019 of the Liberation Task Force during the 75th commemoration of the Operation.
Aalst, September 18th 1944
After having spent the night in Valkenswaard, the armored column of 30th Corps advances north towards Eindhoven. In Aalst, just south of the city, they are held up by German 88 millimeter guns at the Eikenburg estate further up the road.
Aalst, September 18th 1944
A British M4 Sherman tank takes cover behind a building at the junction of Emmastraat en the main road which leads to Eindhoven and eventually to Arnhem.
Aalst, September 18th 1944
An Irish Guards Sherman has taken position perpendicular to the road with its main gun pointed north towards Eindhoven. Flat trajectory fire from the 88s could not reach this point, so the damage to the bakery shop must be caused by British artillery which knocked out a German StuG moments before and a hundred yards south of this location.
Aalst, September 18th 1944
Tank crew members have dismounted from their vehicle after forward elements of the Irish Guards have dealt with the German 88s up ahead. German counter attacks on the route to Arnhem led to the Allied soldiers dubbing this road "Hell's Highway". 
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
American paratroopers of the 101st Airborne Division discuss tactics on the corner of Grote Berg and Wal in Eindhoven. The building on the right was a tobacco shop  and in today's glass building is the office of a student housing rental agency.

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
An American paratrooper of the 101st Airborne division patrols Prins Hendrikstraat passed house number 51 while Mr. A. Dankers tells a young boy in a party hat to make way.

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944

On Aalster Weg citizens cheer at the crew of a British Sexton self-propelled artillery vehicle of 30th Corps moving towards the center of the city. It is about to pass the St. Jozef Hospital on the right, marked with large red crosses against air raids.

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Almost the same location as in the previous comparison but now on the parallel road with access to the Hospital. Crowds can be seen behind the landscaping in the boulevard  as they welcome troops of the British 30th Corps into their city.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A well camouflaged British "Staghound" Mk I armored car stacked with ammunition crates rather than extra fuel drums, is parked on Bilderdijklaan. The building in the background was the German "Wehrmachtskommandantur".
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
British dispatch riders and trucks of the Armored Car Regiment on their way north pass Saint Catharina Church on Stratumseind waved on by liberated citizens.

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
An M4 Sherman tank of the British 30th Corps rolls north on Demer in downtown Eindhoven. "Now-"photo was kindly taken by staff of the Ziggo customers shop. Demer is a shopping area for pedestrians only today.
Son, September 17th-19th 1944
General Taylor established the 101st Airborne Division HQ in the catholic community center Saint Cornelius in Son from September 17th until the 20th, 1944. Today the building houses the Vestzak Theater.
Son, September 17th-19th 1944
Staff Sergeant William E. Kiley of Division G3 (Operations) and Military Policeman Private First Class Paul B. Teator, guard the HQ situated behind the cameraman. The church in the background sustained so much damage during a fire in 1958 that only the tower was left intact. A new catholic community center on the field where Kiley and Teator had their photo taken makes a good "Now-"comparison difficult.
 

 

Son, September 19th 1944
British Royal Engineers have built a Bailey Bridge across Wilhelmina Canal where on the first day of Operation Market Garden the road bridge was blown up by the Germans seconds before American paratroopers could capture it.
Son, September 20th 1944
The German 107th Panzer brigade strikes at the corridor from Bourg Leopold in Belgium towards Arnhem. Two British trucks are hit in the distance and medical staff transporting wounded soldiers in southern direction take cover is a roadside ditch. 
Son, September 20th 1944
Among the men taking cover in the ditch was a British Army Film and Photo Unit member who took these photos. The enemy fire is coming from the East; from the left in the picture.
Son, September 20th 1944
American medics have taken the wounded on their stretchers from the ambulances and put them in the ditch. Note that these are colored soldiers in the segregated US Army of the 1940's. These photos are iconic for what was later named "Hell's Highway".
Son, September 20th 1944
A British anti-aircraft unit with Bofors guns, moves north and passes the burnt trucks which have been pushed in the ditch on the east side of the road. The ditch is full of Jerry cans with fuel.
Mariaheide, September 22nd 1944
Carnage after a German attack further north along Hell's Highway close to Veghel. A truck and two 40mm Bofors anti-aircraft guns of 408 Battery Royal Artillery 123rd Bn, The City of London Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment, "E" Troop (named "Ells-Bells" and "Ellzapoppin" by their crews) are knocked out by German tanks.
Mariaheide, September 22nd 1944
On that day, a German counter-attack blocked the route of advance of the British 30th Corps in their advance towards Arnhem during Operation "Market Garden".
Mariaheide, September 22nd 1944
Two more photos of the damage done to the Bofors canons and a truck of "E" Troop, 408 Battery Royal Artillery 123rd Bn, The City of London Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment in Mariaheide in September 1944.
Mariaheide, September 22nd 1944

These images show the level railway crossing in the background and American paratroopers riding by in trucks. At least one photo is taken from the back of these trucks.

Veghel, September 17th 1944
Two paratroopers of 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment and a citizen of Veghel with a drink. The "Then-" photo was in black and white originally and has been restored in color. Note the letter "G" in a lighting bolt on the life preserver, representing the regimental nickname "Geronimo". The paratrooper on the left wears an M42 parachutist jacket under his M43 uniform.
Veghel, September 1944
Paratroopers of "G" Company of the 327th Glider Infantry Regiment relax in the back yard of the Van Dooren family farm in the hamlet of Dorshout. This unit was the 101st Airborne Divison's reserve in this area on September 29th and 30th.
Veghel, September17th 1944
After having crossed Wilhelmina Canal on Sluis Straat in Veghel, men of 2nd Battalion of the 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment assemble to enter Veghel. The men in the foreground have been identified as members of the Regimental intelligence section. The photo was taken by the divisional photographer Al Krochka. The sign on the left says: "Veghel For Industry. Information: Mayor".
Sint Oedenrode, September 20th-24th 1944
Henkenshage Castle; Division HQ after the building in Son was damaged by artillery fire; see above. In the foreground in the "Then-"photo T/4 George E. Koskimaki; radioman of 
Sint Oedenrode, September 23rd 1944
Brig. Gen. Gerald J. Higgins, assistant division commander of the 101st Airborne and Lt.Gen. Miles C. Dempsey, commander of the British 2nd Army, in the court yard of Henkenshage Castle. Here, a day later, Dempsey and lt. Gen. Brian Horrocks of 30th Corps made the decision to withdraw the British 1st Airborne Division from Arnhem.
Eindhoven, September 1944
Soldiers of the 101st Airborne Division pose on the corner of Woenselsestraat and Frankrijkstraat. They came into Eindhoven in the division's "sea-borne tail" and not by parachute or glider.

Elst, October 1944
A comparison often reenacted by battlefield tourists.
Captain Richard D. Winters, commanding "Easy" Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment (a unit made famous by Stephen Ambrose 's book "Band of Brothers) poses in front of the gateway into the "Landgoed Schoonderlogt" estate. During the battle of the Betuwe region, known to the American soldiers as "The Island",' this farm served as Regimental Headquarters of the 506th.

Arnhem, September 17th 1944
Firefighters in action on Bakkerstraat after the RAF targeted military installations in the area, prior to the airborne landings of “Market Garden”. In Arnhem several Dutch Army barracks, occupied by the Germans, were hit but there was collateral damage as well.
Oosterbeek, September 17th 1944
British AFPU photo of Gefreiter (corporal) Jozef Willeke who drove the Citroën staff car of general Kussin straight into the route of advance of the British No.5 Platoon, "B" Company, 3rd Parachute Battalion on the first day of Operation "Market Garden".
More details on the incident can be found here.
Doorwerth Castle, September 18th 1944
A British resupply container has landed on the castle roof and German soldiers rush to it, to retrieve its contents.
Arnhem, September 19th 1944
The following 4 photos were taken by German "Kriegsberichter" Jacobsen and show the arrival of 10 StuGIII self-propelled guns in Arnhem and their advance eastward to the Oosterbeek perimeter. This is on Velper Plein.
Arnhem, September 19th 1944
Self-propelled guns of the Sturmgeschütz Abteilung 280 drive east from Velperplein on Willemsplein. Half of the unit advanced to Oosterbeek via Utrechtseweg (the high road) and the other half via Onderlangs (the low road).
Arnhem, September 19th 1944
SS grenadier infantry follow the StuG's while embedded Luftwaffe war correspondent Erich Wenzel (with riding boots and officer's cap) snaps the previous "Then-"photo.   
Arnhem, September 19th 1944
Onderlangs in Arnhem. British paratroopers surrender en masse to SS troops with self-propelled guns in September 1944. Note para, apparently killed in action while trying to jump a garden fence but got stuck on it with his equipment.
Arnhem, September 19th 1944
A German Army "Kriegsberichter" photographed a British casualty on Onderlangs in close up. This paratrooper was killed while getting stuck on a garden fence with his equipment.
Arnhem, September 19th 1944
British airborne troops of the South Staffordshire Regiment surrender to SS-troops. Note shell holes in the building in the center of the photo and the German 20 millimeter Flak 48 anti-aircraft gun in the foreground which was accidentally crushed by a Sturmgeschütz III self-propelled gun of Kampfgruppe (Battle Group) Möller.
Arnhem, September 19th 1944

Grenadiers of an SS unit cross the fence of the Arnhem Museum on Utrechtsestraat. The building at that time was defended by British troops from the South Staffordshire Regiment.

Arnhem, September 19th 1944

British Airborne troops who have just surrendered, take a moment of rest on the steps of a house on Utrechtsestraat right across the street from the museum. Today this house, which was defended by No. 9 Platoon of “A” Company, the South Staffordshire Regiment has number 70. The arm rail on the right has been altered after the battle to make room for a larger door.

 

Arnhem, September 19th 1944
British soldiers of 2nd Battalion The South Staffordshire Regiment rest on the steps of the Museum shortly after they were taken prisoner. Sitting in a wooden box on the left is Lieutenant Jack Reynolds, commander of the Mortar Platoon.

Arnhem, September 19th 1944

SS-men move east on Utrechtsestraat and have passed the bodies of PVT Norman Shipley and Lance CPL William Loney of "C" Company, 2nd Parachute Battalion. Both were killed two days earlier, acting as scouts when their battalion moved towards Arnhem bridge.

Arnhem, September 19th 1944

The bodies of PVT Norman Shipley and Lance CPL William Loney on the sidewalk of Utrechtsestraat photographed in more detail.

Arnhem, September 19th 1944

The gruesome sight of one of the casualties of "C" Company, 2nd Parachute Battalion at the doorway of a house on Utrechtsestraat.

Arnhem, September 19th 1944
On the corner of Johan de Wittlaan and Boulevard Heuvelink  Luftwaffe Kriegsberichter Jacobsen photographs a 2cm Flak 38 gun crew sent from Deelen air base to support the 9th SS Panzer Division to retake Arnhem bridge which is just a few streets away in the direction where the gun is pointing.
Arnhem, September 19th 1944
Jacobson took a picture of his colleague Erich Wenzel seen here sipping from a bottle of wine. De Wittlaan has hardly changed since 1944 but the tram rails in the street on the left are gone now.
 
Arnhem, September 19th 1944
Luftwaffe personnel is digging a position for their 20 millimeter anti-aircraft gun  Walstraat. The gun crew’s field of fire down the street is in the direction of the Arnhem road bridge leading us to believe they were deployed in an anti-personnel role.
Arnhem, September 19th 1944
British paratroopers of 10th Parachute Battalion appear to have been ambushed as they had reached a distance marker on Amsterdamseweg. The effect of German 20mm cannon fire can be seen on the marker and the bodies.
Oosterbeek, September 20th 1944
Kriegsberichter Höppner photographed the actions of a Flak30 20 millimeter anti-aircraft gun from Flak-Brigade Swoboda on the grounds of the "De Leeren Doedel" inn on the corner of Dreyense Weg and Amsterdamse Weg; the latter running underneath the flight path of Royal Air Force Stirling bombers and Dakota cargo planes resupplying the Airborne forces in the Arnhem area.
Oosterbeek, September 20th 1944
The crew has traversed its gun and fires at a lone Dakota flying towards LZ "L". Four days later the nearby inn was raided and destroyed by Allied bombers because of the flak coming from this location.
Oosterbeek,September 25th 1944

A German officer, in long coat on the right, directs a group of grenadiers on Weverstraat in the direction of the British perimeter around the Hartenstein hotel.

Oosterbeek,September 25th 1944
German grenadiers take cover behind a Sturmgeschütz self-propelled gun which fires down Weverstraat on houses still defended by British paratroopers.
"Then-"photo by German Propaganda-Kompanie "Kriegsberichter" Leutnant Seuffert who arrived in the Oosterbeek perimeter during the final days of the battle.
Oosterbeek,September 25th 1944

The same group of grenadiers is now ordered to move forward by another officer. They advance behind the cover of a StuG self-propelled gun (note empty shells on the road in the foreground) into Van Eeghenweg.

Aalten, March 30th 1945
After advancing from positions in the area of Bocholt in Germany, Grenadier and Irish Guards captured Aalten. Here an M4 Sherman "Firefly" tank is entering the town on Poltstraat at the junction of today's Tramstraat.
Aalten, March 30th 1945
a British M4 Sherman tank rushed down Haartsestraat and is seen here at the junction with Prinsenstraat and the Schiller café on the left corner.
Aalten, March 30th 1945
British trucks enter the town on Dijkstraat across a Bailey bridge built across the river Schlinge. German troops had demolished most bridges in Aalten earlier that month. "Now-"photo shows the stone bridge which was rebuilt in 1949.
Aalten, March 30th 1945
British Bren Carriers rush down Lichtenvoordsestraatweg to the center of town. Note boarded up shops; most likely because of damage done during the March 24th Allied bombing raid on factories in Aalten.
Aalten, March 30th 1945
Seen from just across the street a British Self Propelled 17pdr, Valentine, Mk I, Archer drives down Lichtenvoordsestraatweg.
Aalten, March 30th 1945
Sherman tanks of the British 30th Corps have reached Markt; the central square of the town.
Aalten, March 30th 1945

Armed local Dutch resistance fighters escort German soldiers taken Prisoner of War away from Markt.

Westervoort, April 13th 1945
"
Buffalo" Armored Tracked Vehicles stand ready on Hamersestraat as an infantryman marches in the direction of the railway overpass. On the left is the building of Christian Interests "Rohoboth". Note Dutch red-white-and-blue, Maple Leaf and Union Jack flags flying on the lamp post in the "Now-"photo commemorating the liberation of Westervoort 76 years before this photo was taken.
Westervoort, April 13th 1945
Mortar carriers of the 2nd Battalion, Essex Regiment, 56th Brigade, 49th British Infantry Division (West Riding) wait for orders to cross the river IJssel and advance towards Arnhem.  Note the divisional logo of the “Polar Bears” on the carrier in the foreground.
Westervoort, April 13th 1945
"Buffalo" Amphibious Vehicles, Tracked (LVT) move forward to cross the river IJssel as both the railway and road bridges across this river have been blown up again; this time by the Germans. In May 1940 the Dutch defenders of these bridges blew them up in an attempt to stop the Germans from invading their country.

Westervoort, April 13th 1945

More British vehicle move forward toward the river IJssel, including mortar carriers and halftracks. The embankment on the left is the raised railway line from Germany to Arnhem.

Westervoort, April 13th 1945
Buffalos and their crews wait for their turn to advance west towards the river IJssel and the city of Arnhem. On May 10th 1940, invading Nazi troops used an armored train on the elevated railway line seen here, to be stopped by Dutch defenders of Fort Westervoort up ahead.
Westervoort, April 13th 1945
 British infantry of the 49th Division have just crossed the IJssel River in amphibious "Buffalo" tracked vehicles .They move toward the ferry landing road and on to Arnhem.
Arnhem, April 14th 1945

During Operation  "Anger" (sometimes called "the Second Battle of Arnhem") British soldiers of the 49th Division move forward under cover of a Bren gun team on almost the same location as the SS-men in the photo taken in September in the previous year.

Arnhem, April 14th 1945

We found the "Then-"photo in a post-war newspaper about the liberation of Arnhem in the Gelders Archive and had never seen it before. The location is about the same as the previous, often published, photo on Utrechtsestraat in Arnhem

Arnhem, April 14th 1945
British troops march German POW's in western direction on Utrechtseweg across from the museum.
Compare this photo with the one taken at the same spot on 19SEP1944 with British POW's.
Arnhem, April 14th 1945
a British soldier escorts a German POW at the corner of Oude Kraan and Bergstraat. The city was already evacuated after the first Battle of Arnhem in September 1944 and there were no firefighting teams present. This whole block burned down and was rebuilt in the modern square style of today.
Arnhem, April 14th 1945
A 6 pounder anti-tank gun crew of the British Polar Bear division takes position in a shop window on Willemsplein. Today the building accommodates a branch office of the ING Bank. This scene is recreated in a diorama in the Arnhem War Museum.
Oosterbeek, September 21st 1944
Men of Nos. 15 and 16 Platoons, C Company of 1st Battalion, The Border Regiment, dug in along both sides of Van Lennepweg waiting to repulse an enemy attack on the western edge of the Oosterbeek Perimeter.
When this photo was taken, the enemy was only 100 yards from this location.

 

Oosterbeek, September 1944
A lone wicker basket with long awaited supplies lands in the lawn in front of the Hartenstein Hotel on Utrechtse Weg in Oosterbeek. The Hartenstein was the 1st Airborne Divisional HQ during the Battle of Arnhem.
In 1946 the Airborne Monument was unveiled on this lawn.

Oosterbeek, September 1944
A British soldier aims his U.S. made .30 calibre M1 carbine from the second floor balcony of the Hartenstein Hotel. The hotel served as Headquarters of the British 1st Airborne Division during the Battle of Arnhem. Today it is home to the Airborne Museum.
Oosterbeek, September 1944
General Roy E. Urquhart, commanding officer of the 1st British Airborne Division posing with the division guidon at the back of the Hartenstein Hotel; the divisional headquarters. He is holding a flashlight presumably because of the dark conditions in the cellar of the hotel where the staff housed.
Note also the white and blue flag on the steps telling divisional Signals is located inside the building.
Oosterbeek, September 1944
A team of stretcher bearers carrying away a wounded British para behind the Hartenstein hotel.
Oosterbeek, September 1944
Sergeant Gordon "Jock" Walker, film camera operator of the British Army Film and Photographic Unit "embedded" with the 1st Airborne Division during the Battle of Arnhem, pictured outside the Hartenstein Hotel, Oosterbeek, some day between September 17th and 25th 1944.
Oosterbeek, September 1944
Debris and broken furniture on the back lawn shortly after the withdrawal of the British paratroopers on September 26th 1944.
Oosterbeek, September 1944
April 2019: The restoration of the front of the Hartenstein is done. The building of the Airborne Museum in Oosterbeek is now as it was on September 16th 1944.
Oosterbeek, September 1944
Closer to the Hartenstein, British defensive positions of slit trenches and sand bags are visible. Note also the damage to the building.
Oosterbeek, September 1944
A close study of the front of the Hartenstein shows damage caused by artillery and small arms fire which can still be seen after the 2019 restoration.

Arnhem, September 19th 1944
SS men take positions east of the Arnhem central railway station on Oranje Straat. Earlier this day British paratroopers have surrendered in large numbers and now the Germans are strengthening their positions in the city. This is the high ground next to the railway yards.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
British Airborne defenders of the Van Limburg Stirum school near the northern ramp of Arnhem bridge, surrendered after a German tank and self-propelled gun had set the building on fire. As prisoners of war they were led away from the bridge into Johan van Oldenbarneveld Straat, photographed by German propaganda journalists.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
Glider pilots, sappers of the 1st Parachute Squadron Royal Engineers and parachute infantrymen of "C" Company 3rd Battalion are led away past No.'s 11 and 13 on Johan van Oldenbarneveld Straat.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
Royal engineers Sergeant Norman Swift, Sapper Charles Grier and Sapper Dick Robb walk passed a building that today houses a kindergarten.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
The prisoners were then led into the yard of a timber company at No. 15. The photograph shows Lieutenant Wright and Sapper George Needham of "A" Troop supporting Sapper Papworth.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
The POW's look dazed when lined up by their captors. German photographer Pirath took this image of Lance-Corporal Swainson, Sapper Booth, Privates Moran and Withers and Corporal Weir.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
British prisoners of war in the yard of the Klugkist timber company on Johan van Oldenbarneveld Straat.
There is a parking lot of an apartment building there today.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
Royal Engineers Sappers Grier and Robb, documented by German photographer Kutzner, in an iconic image of the British defeat at Arnhem.

Arnhem, September 20th 1944
The same group of men of 3rd Battalion and Royal Engineers taken prisoner after the fall of the Van Limburg Stirum School in the series of photographs shot by the German Luftwaffe war correspondent Helmuth Pirath. Colorized by Nick Beech.

Arnhem, September 20th 1944
Grenadiers and crew members of Kampfgruppe "Knaust" have dismounted from theirtanks in the Rijnwijk neighborhood near Arnhem bridge waiting for the surrendered British paras to leave the area.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
Kpfw IIIs of Panzerkompanie Mielke on Nieuwe Kade with the Arnhem bridge in the background. The PzKpfw III Ausf M on the right was parked in the driveway of Jos Pe printing firm.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
A crew member of one of the PzKpfw III tanks of Panzerkompanie Mielke poses behind his vehicle on the corner of Nieuwe Kade and Badhuisstraat. The Arnhem road bridge is just around the corner to the right and the tank is parked behind the cover of the Jos Pé printing company.
Arnhem, September 20th 1944
After the war the large window has been bricked shut. These last 4 photos were taken with the camera of crew member Karl-Heinz Kracht who is seen here eating from his mess kit.

Oosterbeek, late September 1944
A knocked out captured French Char B tank concerted into a flame throwing  “Flammwagen auf Panzerkampfwagen B-2(f)”. of Panzer-Kompanie 224,  on Sonnenberglaan. This German unit was stationed in Arnhem during Operation Market Garden, losing six tanks to anti-tank weaponry when they were sent to attack the Oosterbeek perimeter on 20–21SEP1944. This vehicle was  knocked out by a British 17 pounder anti-tank gun after it came into this area from the north.

Oosterbeek, late September 1944
A German "StuG"  sits on Benedendorpsweg in Oosterbeek. It was knocked out by one of the British anti-tank guns manned by John Baskeyfield on 20SEP1944 which earned him the Victoria Cross posthumously.
Oosterbeek, late September 1944
This photo was taken across the road from the Old Church on the corner of Benedendorpsweg and Weverstraat looking west toward Rozensteeg. It shows a British anti-tank gun left behind after the battle; most likely a 6 pounder.
Oosterbeek, late September 1944
Damaged houses on Stationsweg. The house on the left is No.6 and is close to the crossroads where in the Schoonoord and Vreewijk buildings the British Dressing Stations were located. This also marked the eastern boundary of the perimeter.
Arnhem, late September 1944
Photo taken after the battle of Arnhem looking east into Westervoortsedijk through the Arnhem road bridge.
On the right in both the Then and the Now photo's are the remnants of milk plants.
Arnhem, September 21st 1944
After the British paratroopers at Arnhem bridge have surrendered, German troops rush south to attack the British at Nijmegen. No traffic circle today but wide double lanes on Nijmeegse Weg.
Arnhem, September 21st 1944
German troops of what is assumed to be "Kampfgruppe Knaust". The German "Arnhem" sign with several arrows painted across it, was on the spot where the electric trolley bus lane is today.
Arnhem, Late September 1944
 In between the north-east ramp of the Rhine road bridge and Eusebiussingel are the ruins of the Van Limburg Stirum School defended by Royal Engineers of the 1st Parachute Squadron's "A" Troop.
Arnhem, Late September 1944
After the end of World War Two the entire city section around the bridge, named "John Frost Bridge" today, was redesigned and newly developed making a precise Now & Then comparison a difficult one.
Arnhem, Late September 1944
Another photo of the carnage around the Van Limburg School on the north west ramp of the Arnhem road bridge after the battle. The ramp has no buildings on it today and is converted into a tranquil park.
Nijmegen, September 20th 1944
On the Southern ramp of the road bridge across the Waal river, American paratroopers of the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment look down on wounded German soldiers who moments before this photo was taken, were there adversaries during the battle for the bridge. .
Nijmegen, September 27th 1944
British paras who have escaped from the Oosterbeek perimeter cheer relieved becasue they have survived the Battle of Arnhem. This picture is a still from a British newsreel.
Nijmegen, September 27th 1944
Paras, some of them identified as members of the Reconnaissance Squadron, sort out their weapons in front of the Bishop Hamers buidling; also known as the Pagoda because of the Chinese looking viewing platform on its roof.
Nijmegen, September 27th 1944
An unidentified Airborne Captain jokes with other paratroopers who have escaped the Oosterbeek perimeter because the Captain left without his army issued trousers and combat boots.
Nijmegen, September 27th 1944
British soldiers smile for the camera after they have successfully withdrawn from the Oosterbeek perimeter. The wall in the background is surrounding the building which was a collection point for soldiers who returned from the Battle of Arnhem.
Nijmegen, September 27th 1944
 Major Dick Lonsdale (left) of Lonsdale Force, gets a light from 1LT David Polley of "C" Section (lines) of Division Signals. They are photographed in front of the Roman Catholic College for female teachers on Groesbeekseweg.

Nijmegen, October 1944
A Kodachrome color photo of Nijmegen bridge from the photo album of MAJ Allen Bedell, commanding officer of the 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion which took part in the heroic Waal river crossing on September 20th, 1944.  (Photo courtesy of Arthur Rottier from Anhem.)

Eindhoven September 20th, 1944
Damage to houses on August Sniederslaan after the German bombing raid on Eindhoven. The staff car in the foreground was lent to American generals Brereton of the 1st Allied Airborne Army and Ridgway of the 18th Airborne Corps by Field Marshal Montgomery’s staff. The generals, curious about the development of Operation “Market Garden”  drove to Eindhoven in this car to be caught in the raid. They abandoned their vehicle to head for cover.
Eindhoven, October 1944
American pilots of the Ninth Air Force ride jeeps on Zeelsterstraat to Landing Zone "W" near Son. Their task will be to fly CG4A gliders that are still air-worthy after the Operation "Market Garden", back to air bases in England.
(Photo courtesy of Arthur Rottier from Anhem.)
Eindhoven, late 1944
The control tower of the Welschap aerodrome, built in 1935, is now in use by the Royal Air Force. During the German occupation, this was the "Fliegerhorst EIndhoven" of the Luftwaffe. The building is now a restaurant and is located in the center of a new residential area in between Eindhoven and Meerveldhoven, named "Meerhoven".
Elst, October 1944
In this day and age no photo comparison album would be complete without the photo of Captain Richard Winters, commanding "E" Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, posing in front of his Command Post at the Schoonderlogt farm on Logtse Straat in Elst.  Winters and "Easy" Company were made world famous by the HBO TV series "Band of Brothers" which is the filming of historian Stephen Ambrose's book with the same title in 2001.
Elst, October 1944
On 4OCT1944, Generals Taylor and McAuliffe visited COL Johnson at his CP on the Eshof farm. They are seen here while visiting the Intelligence (S-2) section in the farm “The Logt”, just north of the Schoonderlogt estate in the previous photo. Johnson would be killed on 8OCT1944 by mortar fragments along the dike west of Driel.

Valburg, Autumn 1944
A Sherman Tank of the 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division is parked close to the cemetery on Bakker Straat in Valburg.
Valburg, Autumn 1944
It is assumed that these officers, posing in front of the Reformed church in Valburg are captains Joe, Ganier and Jackson, commanding Batteries D, E and F of the 81st AT/AA Bn.
Valburg, Autumn 1944
Hospital ward tents of Platoon “B” of the 50th Field Hospital set up on the fields of Fruithof Farm of the Speyer Family on Reethse Straat. The 50th FH was responsible for first aid closest to the battlefield of the 101st Airborne Division.
Valburg, Autumn 1944
A red cross panel is laid out in the field near the hospital tents to prevent it from being shelled or bombed as happened to the 101st Airborne division Clearing Station in Nijmegen on 29OCT1944; killing 8 men. The Fruithof Farm is at right and Sherman tanks are on Reethse Straat at left.
Andelst, Autumn 1944
Regimental Surgeon CPT Louis R. Kent of the American 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, and T/4 Paul Miller in front of the Aid Station in Andelst. The church gate is in the background.
Opheusden, October 1944
In front of a Dutch casemate along the Linge Canal on Dalwagense Weg in Opheusden, forward observer SGT William J. Stone of “B” Battery, 321st Glider Field Artillery Battalion radios coordinates to the firing batteries by means of his SCR-609 artillery ground radio.
Dodewaard, Autumn 1944
Two members of the 81st AT/AA Bn pose in front of the dyke warehouse on Waalbandijk in Dodewaard where they are stationed. The SS-graffiti have been painted on the wall because of the Dutch had at that time, destroyed road signs. The next SS post is 12 kilometers ahead in Tiel. In the “Now-“photo historian Bauke Huisman of the Betuwe War Information Center examines the outer walls for battle damage and possible paint residue.
Dodewaard, Autumn 1944
1LT Kizenkavich on Waalbandijk in Dodewaard a few hundred meters ahead from the dyke warehouse. In the background is the Reformed church of Dodewaard.
Slijk-Ewijk, Autumn 1944
An MP of the 101st Airborne Division directs the car of a local doctor along Valburgse Straat on the junction with Akker Straat on the right. There the Division Forward CP, call sign “Kangaroo FWD CP” is located.
Hemmen, Autumn 1944
On 10OCT1944 the 502nd PIR took over the southern half of the line held by the 327th Glider Infantry Regiment in Opheusden. Until 15OCT1944, the Germans kept attempting to clear the Betuwe area. Here an American patrol crosses the railway line between Hemmen and Dodewaard.
Heteren, Autumn 1944
The windmill on the dike between Randwijk and Heteren, just east of the T-junction with Renkumse Veer road leading to the ferry boat across the Rhine.Al Krochka staged this photograph of SGT Gillis, PFC Newton and PVT’s Wilson and Turer of “F” Company of the 501st advancing cautiously passed the shell-damaged windmill.
Heteren, Autumn 1944
 In the field between the windmill and the river, the Germans rallied for an attack but were surprised by CPT Winters and a platoon of “E” Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment. The windmill was the target of a German artillery barrage because it could be used as an observation post. After the war the mill was demolished and today only its mound remains.
Herveld, Autumn 1944
PFC’s Woodell, Lee, Mettie, CPL Radovick and PVT Skok, a Browning .50 caliber machine gun crew of the 907th Glider Field Artillery Bn., are positioned in a field on Meeuwerdense Straat in Herveld. The farm in the background was their BN HQ
Herveld, Autumn 1944
1SGT Ellis and 1LT Kizenkavich of "E" Battery 81st Anti-Tank/Anti-Aircraft Battalion of the 101st Airborne Division pose in front of the windmill in Herveld.
After the war an earthen mount was constructed around the windmill.
 
Herveld, Autumn 1944
CPT Swanson of “A” Company of the 502nd PIR found a British BSA M20 motorbike which he used to drive up and down to Division HQ in Slijk-Ewijk. Here he is pictured at the Moordakker Farm in Herveld where “A” Company’s CP was established at that time.
Herveld, Autumn 1944
CPT Swanson is seen here riding his BSA motorbike off the driveway to the Moordakkerweg road.
Oosterhout, November 25th 1944
Men of “A” Battery, 377th Parachute Field Artillery BN board storm boats of the Canadian 23rd Field Company who ferried them across the Waal River away from their deployment on “The Island”.
Weurt, November 25th 1944
Paratroopers of the 101st Airborne Division board heavy trucks on Jonkerstraat, which will take them on an 18 hour ride to Camp Mourmelon near Reims in Northern France. Here they would rest and rearm until the Nazi Ardennes Offensive on December 16th 1944. Note combat ration wrappers discarded in the ditch in the last minute before boarding.
 
's-Hertogenbosch, October 26th 1944
Photo by Kriegsberichter Rutkowski at the railway station of the capital city of the Dutch province of North-Brabant. A Fallschirmjäger with a Panzerfaust anti-tank rocket talks to another German soldier, presumably of the 559th Schwere Heeres Panzerjäger Abteilung (heavy anti-tank brigade). Note the cigarette in the hand of the center soldier and the "smokers column" on the modern day platform.
's-Hertogenbosch, October 26th 1944
British photographer Peter Handford shot this scene on the corner of Vughter Straat and Berewout Straat in front of the Van Dartel fish shop. Local resistance fighter Martin Suiskens brandishes a captured German Mauser rifle while soldiers of the Welsh Division cross the street.
Biest-Houtakker, October 27th 1944
During the attack on Tilburg soldiers of 8th Battalion the Royal Scots Fusiliers (15th Scottish Division) take a rest next to the road on Biestsestraat a short distance away from the draw bridge across the Wilhelminakanaal waterway.
Spoordonk, October 25th 1944
Churchill tanks with infantry of the 6th Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers cross the river Beerze during their advance on Tilburg. The bridge is too weak and a Bailey bridge had been constructed to strengthen it. This is the first of a series of Now&Then diptychs showing the advance of Scottish troops on Tilburg during Operation “Pheasant”.
Spoordonk, October 25th 1944
On the road from Spoordonk to Moergestel. Just over 2 miles from the watermill in the previous comparison, soldiers of the Royal Scots Fusiliers march west.
Moergestel, October 25th 1944
Infantry of the Royal Scots Fusiliers march west as the commander of a Churchill tank looks into the war correspondent's camera lens.
Moergestel, October 25th 1944

This photo was taken only a few hundred yard west of yesterday's comparison. Infantry of the Royal Scots Fusiliers and Churchill tanks of the 6th Guards Armoured Brigade stand still seemingly waiting for orders to continue their advance.

Moergestel, October 25th 1944
Infantry of the 15th Highland Division advance from Oirschot to Tilburg and near the outskirts of Moergestel on their way. On the right, verges are being cleared of mines; on the left side of the road is the Draaiboompje Café.
Moergestel, October 25th 1944
The following ten (10) Now & Then comparisons tell a minute-by-minute account in pictures of the Scots Guards (part of the 6th Guards Tank Brigade in support of the 15th Scottish Division) during Operation “Pheasant” reaching Moergestel to find a bridge in the road into town destroyed.
Moergestel, October 25th 1944

The Churchill tank named “Montrose”, commanded by Lieutenant Archie Fletcher, tried to cross the river Reusel but unfortunately it slipped back into the creek and sank in the mud.

Moergestel, October 25th 1944

Despite the bridge being blown, infantry gets across the Reusel river by means of a make-shirt footbridge created by local civilians. Here villagers are seen throwing stones and debris from the bridge in the creek to make it more shallow.

Moergestel, October 25th 1944
A Scottish infantry soldier carrying a PIAT (Projector Infantry Anti-Tank) is helped climbing the west bank of the Reusel river after he crossed the makeshift footbridge.
Moergestel, October 25th 1944
A Scottish Churchill tank equipped with a Class 30 “Scissors” bridge arrives at the river Reusel under a loud applause from the gathered crowd. The tank named “Montrose” is still bogged down in the muddy bank on the right.
Moergestel, October 25th 1944
The crowd watches in silence as the scissors bridge is lowered on the banks of the Reusel river over the demolished bridge. A Royal Engineers officer stands on top of the bridge to oversee the correct way to lay it across.
Moergestel, October 25th 1944
The scissors bridge across the remnants of the old Reusel river bridge is in place and a Bren Carrier rolls across it. A dispatch rider with a Sten gun slung on his back, waits his turn to cross.
Moergestel, October 25th 1944

Another Bren Carrier drives over the scissors bridge across the Reusel river.
A dispatch rider with a Sten gun slung on his back is directing traffic; perhaps the man waiting in yesterday’s Then-photo.

Moergestel, October 25th 1944
Another Bren Carrier drives over the scissors bridge across the Reusel river.
Note white marker poles for navigating across the narrow steel bridge.
Moergestel, October 25th 1944
Finally across the river Reusel, the Scots fan out in western direction. On Oisterwijkseweg Kangaroos (armored personnel carriers) dash forward towards the objective; the city of Tilburg.
Esch, late October 1944
Allied troops were already on Postel Straat in the village of Esch when German troops blew up the nearby bridge on 24OCT1944.  When the fighting had died down a Bailey bridge was constructed. For the 75th anniversary of the Liberation of Esch in 2019 a temporary plywood cover over the bridge’s sides gave the new bridge the impression of a Bailey bridge.
Baarle-Nassau, late October 1944

Polish MP's give directions in front of the village pump and the town hall. Baarle Nassau, just across the Dutch border, was liberated on October 28th, 1944.

Westkapelle, November 1st 1944
British Commandos who have just landed on the beach about a mile behind the cameraman, advance inland on Zuidstraat through Westkapelle which was bombed by the Allies a month before Operation "Infatuate II"
Westkapelle, November 1st 1944
German Prisoners of War are escorted to the beach during operations to clear the Scheldt estuary for naval traffic to the port of Antwerp. Note the light house in the background.
Wageningen, May 5th 1945
In Hotel "De Wereld" the instrument of surrender of all German military forces in the Netherlands is presented to their commander, Generaloberst der Infanterie, Johannes Blaskowitz, by Canadian commander in chief General Foulkes.
Wageningen, May 5th 1945
Another photo taken during the meeting with Gierman military leaders in the Netherlands, with a change of seats around the table compared with the previous image. The room is named Capitulation Room today.
Arnhem, Spring 1945
After the battle two British Military Policemen examine a "C" type drop container used for aerial resupply of the encircled Airborne soldiers in the Oosterbeek perimeter. At the other end of the rail road underpass the fence works around the KEMA compound can be seen.
Oosterbeek, Spring 1945
The bullet-riddled railway underpass on Klingelbeelseweg. This is the route Lt-Col John Frost and his 2nd BN took to get to Arnhem Bridge. To the right the embankment leads to the railway bridge which was blown up by the Germans when the first British paratroopers where on it. To the left is the Oosterbeek Laag railway station.
Arnhem, Spring 1945
"The spoils of war".
Tunnel under the railway on Beeldhouwerstraat with Nazi gas mask canisters, a "Panzerfaust" anti-tank weapon, potato masher stick grenades, an MG42 machine gun and a hand-painted warning sign.
Arnhem, Spring 1945

On Rijnkade, the promenade on the northern bank of the river, German trenches dug after the Battle of Arnhem in September 1944 can be seen as well as the temporary Bailey bridge across the river where the road bridge had been destroyed by Allied bombers.

Arnhem, 1945
A British Airborne soldier has returned to Arnhem in April 1945 and looks in the direction of the bridge or rather, where it used to be as it was destroyed by US Air Corps bombers on October 7th, 1944. Note bridge tower room on the right side of the road where the Germans positioned a anti-aircraft gun.
Arnhem, 1945
Almost the same location as the previous one. The British Airborne soldier and the cameraman have turned 180 degrees and now look down the road bridge ramp at the top of the stairs near the Van Limburg Stirum School.
Arnhem, 1945


Presumably the same paratrooper looks at the field grave of an "Unbekannter englischer Soldat"; German for Unknown English soldier near the Van Limburg Stirum School.

Echt early 1945
A woman and two American soldiers look at Nazi graffiti: "Never 1918 again" and "A people rises". Echt is situated in the narrowest part of Limburg where the distance between the Belgian frontier in the west and the eastern border with Germany is only 14 kilometers. These slogans were clearly meant to inspire Nazis traveling from Belgium back into the Heimat.
Son, September 17th 1944
General Taylor and his staff race in Southern direction to Son down the road from the Drop Zone.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Lieutenants Williams, Schroeder and Haley of HQ/506th take a break at the foot of the Vlokhoven Church. Note fragments of slate from the roof tiles on the ground, shot down by troopers aiming at the steeple for suspected snipers.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A paratrooper of the 506th poses for the camera on Frankrijk Straat. Mister Kluijtmans watches the scene over the rims of his glasses.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Curious citizens take a look at the German 88mm gun that paratroops of "F"-Co./506th have just taken out on the junction of Frankrijk Straat, Woenselse Straat and Klooster Dreef.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
After the link-up with the British XXX Corps, paratroopers of the 506th Regiment and American glider pilots hitch a ride on an armored vehicle on Frankrijk Straat.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A paratroop lieutenant takes 5 on a bench in front of No. 9 Frankrijk Straat.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Annie Molteni (with striped socks) and the Van den Broek sisters offer paratroopers a cup of coffee at the entrance gate of the Frater School on Frankrijk Straat. The school is now an Islamic elementary school. Note Arabic half moon ornament in today's school fence.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Annie Molteni and Lenie van den Broek 'lead' a lieutenant of the 506th down Frankrijk Straat.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
This picture is taken on Frankrijk Straat; just a few hundred yards South of the two German 88mm guns that "F"-Co./506th destroyed on Klooster Dreef (see specific Case File # 2). In the photo we see Colonel Robert F. Sink, the Commanding Officer of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, walking towards the center of Eindhoven.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
This picture is taken on Frankrijk Straat; just a few hundred yards South of the two German 88mm guns that "F"-Co./506th destroyed on Klooster Dreef (see specific Case File # 2). In the photo we see Colonel Robert F. Sink, the Commanding Officer of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, walking towards the center of Eindhoven.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Major Oliver Horton, Commanding Officer of 3rd Bn and Captain Harwick of "H"-Co./506th walk South on Demer. Demer was almost a vacant lot in 1944 as a result of an R.A.F.-bombing raid on the nearby Philips Factory on December 6th 1942.
 
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A bit further South someone took this picture of a group of paratroopers. In the "Now-"picture only the two buildings on the left have survived the 1942 bombing and the city's modernization.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers of the 506th Parachute Inf. Regt. move towards the bridges across the Dommel River on Ten Hage Straat.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A paratrooper takes five on the steps of No. 11 Ten Hage Straat.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
This, of course, is a classic! Paratroopers of "HQ"- Co./506th Regiment take five in front of the Catharina Church in the center of Eindhoven.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Troops of the 506th Regiment use a pram to haul their equipment on Keizers Gracht.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers of the 506th take time to pose with nurses on the steps of the Van Abbe Museum. Note the uniformed museum guard in the back of the 1944 photo. Today's guard posed for our comparison picture.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
An officer of "HQ"-Co./506th with his radio operator near the harbor in Eindhoven. We used an even older picture for comparison this time. The aerial photograph shows where the picture is taken near one of the bridges that were the objectives of the 101st in Operation Market Garden.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
This is the Then & Now comparison picture of the photos described above. The Eindhoven Canal harbor has no industrial function anymore and the regional Electricity Company now has its office building on the site of the café in the "Then-" pictures.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Captain Clarence Hester, S3-(Operations) Officer of 3rd Bn/506th inspects the troops on Geldropseweg on his Cushman 53 Airborne Scooter. The bicycle stands in for the Cushman Scooter.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Again Captain Clarence Hester. He is on the same spot as in the previous photograph, only the photographer has changed position. The symbol on today's bicycle lane seems to indicate the spot of the Cushman Scooter in 1944!
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers of "E"-Co./506th Regiment discuss tactics on Vestdijk.
 
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A member of the Eindhoven Police Dept. summons civilians to stay indoors because not all German soldiers have surrendered yet. A trooper of the 506th rides along on Grote Berg.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Three pictures of paratroopers in the center of Eindhoven. All photographs have the Philips "Light-tower" in the background; a duration test lab for light bulbs. The trooper in the photograph on the right carries the "Radio Set SCR-300-A BC-1000-A".
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers pose with a motorcycle on Emma Singel, near the Philips "Light-tower".
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Two photographs taken just moments after each other by Eindhoven photographer A. van Beurden on Stratums Eind. The Dutch priest is Deken ("deacon") Maas and the US priest is Father McGettigan, Chaplain of the 506th Regiment.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A Sky Soldier is lifted on the shoulders of happy citizens on Stratums Eind.

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A paratroopers takes five on Stratums Eind; bayonet fixed.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Almost the same position as the previous picture but taken from the first floor of the Hoppenbrouwers Family across the street. This is Café "Fenix" in 1944 or "The Krazy Kangaroo" today.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A .30 caliber machine gun crew takes position near one of the bridges across the Dommel River on Stratums Eind. This is Café "Dijk 9" today. The trooper in front is Harold C. Boye of "A"-Co./506th who was Killed in Action a few weeks after this photograph was taken.

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
"A Bridge Not Too Far". The bridges across the Dommel river in the center of the city of Eindhoven where the southern-most waterway crossings to be captured by Allied airborne units during Operation "Market Garden".

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers take up defensive positions near the Dommel river bridge on the intersection of Kanaalstraat, Bleekstraat, Nachtegaallaan and Kanaaldijk-Zuid.
In the monastery a Red Cross flag in the window indicates the presence of an aid station.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers take up defensive positions near the Dommel river bridge in the south western corner of the intersection at a café. The porch has been removed after the war.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment take up defensive positions near the Dommel river bridge on the intersection of Kanaalstraat, Bleekstraat, Nachtegaallaan and Kanaaldijk-Zuid.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944

A local lady from Eindhoven is sitting on the Dommel river bridge’s railing flanked on her left by a paratrooper with an SCR-300-A BC-1000-A radio on his back and a sky soldier on her right who holds a BC-611 (SCR-536) "Handie-Talkie" in his hand.

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Eindhoven citizens flock around a paratrooper armed with a .30 calibre M1 Carbine in front of the Mariënhage convent. The civilian on the left got an American invasion flag as a souvenir which he pinned on his coat.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944

Lt. Thomas A. Rhodes Jr. of "F" Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment is photographed on the Dommel river bridge. He is wearing a scarf made from parachute fabric.

Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Two paratroopers of "C"-Co./506th in a captured German "Umbauwagen", pick-up truck. This is on Nagtegaal Laan.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
The same street with troopers of 3rd Bn./506th, who attract quite a crowd of liberated citizens.
Eindhoven, September 19th 1944
The next day the Umbauwagen was used to transport one of the heavy weapons platoons of the 506th. This is on 't Hofke.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
No British tanks anymore, no paratroopers, but the St Joris Church tower still stands on Stratumse Dijk.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Another .30 caliber machine gun crew has taken position in the front yard of the house of the Roman Catholic Priest of the St. Joris Church on Saint Joris Straat.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers pose with priests and Dutch resistance fighters in the front yard of the Parish House on St. Joris Straat.
"UNDER INVESTIGATION"
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
This picture is still "Under Investigation". When taking the comparison picture of the .30 caliber machine gun crew near the St. Joris Church, we made the working hypothesis that this is the same wall used as background by this shaving paratrooper.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Paratroopers of the 506th Parachute Inf. Regt. assisted by members of the Eindhoven Police Dept. escort German P.O.W.s in Northern direction on Demer.
Eindhoven, September 18th, 1944
A large crowd has gathered in front of the Eindhoven Police Headquarters on Groote Berg as resistance workers round up Nazi sympathizers.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
The crowd watches collaborators being brought in by members of the PAN resistance group on Hagenkamp Weg.
Eindhoven, September 18th, 1944
Eindhoven Boy Scouts are put to use in 'guarding' Nazi sympathizers locked up in the Don Bosco School.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
A paratrooper and his new best friends on Tram Straat.
Eindhoven, September 18th 1944
Spontaneous celebration by the people of Eindhoven on Markt.
Eindhoven, September 19th 1944
Troopers of 3rd Bn./506th march towards Welschap Air Base on a combat patrol, aimed at expanding the perimeter around Eindhoven.

Eindhoven, September 19th 1944
Another picture showing 3rd Bn marching by.
This picture is taken from the rooftop of the Eindhoven Police Headquarters. The building has changed dramatically over the years.
Eindhoven, September 19th 1944
Water-pump station at the rail road depot, demolished by German sabotage units, seen from the Dommel Bridge on Park Laan.
Eindhoven, September 19th, 1944
Paratroops hitch a ride on a British tank on Wal.
Son, September 19th 1944
Another view of the knocked-out Panther tank on the South side of the Wilhelmina Canal.
Son, September 19th 1944
A Panther tank of German Panzerbrigade 107 has reached the Wilhelmina Canal near the repaired bridge of Son. It is knocked out by artillery of the 101st Airborne Division.
Dinther, September 17th 1944
After landing on Drop Zone "A-1", L.t. Col. Harry W.O. Kinnard's 1st Bn./501st moved through the town of Heeswijk en route to Veghel.
Dinther, September 17th 1944
Paratroopers of 1st. Bn./501st move through Dinther's Main Street.
Heeswijk, September 17th 1944
Advancing to their objectives in Veghel, Lt. Col. Kinnard's troopers of 1st Battallion of the 501st pass the town hall of Heeswijk.
Heeswijk, September 17th 1944
Here paratroopers of 1st Bn/501 move through School Straat near the house named "Hogenhof". This was the main road to Veghel. A new parallel road now runs behind these houses.
Veghel, September 17th 1944
Paratroopers enter Veghel on Nieuw Straat or Deken van Miert Straat today.
Veghel, September 17th 1944
German prisoners of war pass the nunnery in Veghel to bring a dead soldier in a hearse to the cemetery.
Veghel, September 17th 1944
Medic William A. France, Greetje de Wit of Veghel and Private Leonard Cinquanta pose at the harbor.
Veghel, September 20th 1944
Soldiers of the 326th Airborne Engineers pass a burned-out GMC truck on Hoog Straat in Veghel.
Veghel, September 1944
The harbor in Veghel. The 101st Airborne Division Headquarters was in the CHV building on on the far right.
Veghel, September 1944
Damage to the Fransiscan nuns convent from German mortar shelling.
Oosterbeek, September 21st 1944
Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers of the 1st British Airborne Division cook a meal near the tennis courts behind Hotel Hartenstein The courts served as a POW cage for about 200 German prisoners. After the war, REME veterans donated the bench at this same spot.
Oosterbeek, September 21st 1944
German POW's saw fire wood at the Hartenstein tennis court, guarded by a glider pilot. We took the "Now-photo" at the War and Peace show in Beltring, England in 2005. We believe the Nazi-reenactor was unaware of his resemblance to a POW in 1944.
Oosterbeek, September 1944
German infantrymen move forward toward British positions on the corner of Dam and Wever Straat. They then take paratroopers of the 11th Bn. prisoner who are marched away in front of the same house. The "Now-photo" shows battledetectives Tom and Ivo on the same location in period gear and transportation.
Eindhoven, September 23rd 1944
Prince Bernhard of The Netherlands visits Eindhoven shortly after the city's liberation and is seen here with his staff leaving the Ravensdonck Hotel.
Eindhoven, September 1944
The Partizanen Actie Nederland marches on Bilderdijk Laan. The PAN was an underground resistance group, but could operate freely after the liberation. From that day on, the organization saw its ranks grow.
Driel, October 5th 1944
Radio Operator Frank Carpenter of "C"Co./501st Regiment knocked out a German tank underneath the railwaybridge using a British anti-tank gun. Note the railway bridge in the rear which was blown up by the Germans on September 17th 1944, when British paratroopers where already on it.
Driel, October 5th 1944
The same knocked-out tank seen from a different angle.
Zetten, October 1944
Troops of the 101st move South from Indoornik in the direction of Andelst.
Zetten, October 1944
Detail of the previous picture, showing the road sign and the electrical power house. Note the sign saying: "Dangerous. Post no bills on this building" and the poster in our "Same-Place-Different-Situation-"comparison.
 
Opheusden, October 1944
Soldiers of the 506th move along the railway tracks near the Opheusden Railway Station.
Oirschot, October 2nd, 1944
Because German spotters were suspected in the church steeple, British artillery fired incendiary shell into the Oirschot church, setting it on fire.
Oirschot, October 23rd, 1944
Scottish troops move into Oirschot through Rijkesluis Straat.
Oirschot, October 23rd, 1944
Scottish troops are welcomed by citizens at the corner of Gasthuis Straat and Rijkesluis Straat.
Oirschot, October 23rd, 1944
Finally! Allied military vehicles in Rijkesluis Straat. Today, Oirschot is close to a large military facility and olive green trucks are still a common sight in town
Utrecht, May, 7th 1945
Although the German armed forces in The Netherlands had officially surrendered on May 5, 1945, some Nazi fanatics took shots at civillians and British troops in Bren carriers celebrating the liberation in Utrecht on May 7. Dutch resistance fighters return fire with Sten guns.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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